A busy, busy bishop

Our new diocesan Bishop, Archbishop Mark O’Toole is having a busy time. On Monday he was installed as our archbishop here in Cardiff. Then on Thursday he was installed as Bishop of Menevia at Swansea’s St Joseph’s Cathedral. In between he managed to have his own birthday (59, since you ask). Next, on Monday he flies out to Rome to receive his pallium.

His what, you ask? The pallium is the symbol of an archbishop as opposed to other bishops. It is a band of woven wool placed over his shoulders and looking rather like a letter ’y’ hanging in front and behind. It is decorated with six crosses and some ornate pins.

The pallium is made from lambs whose fleeces are presented by the nuns of the convent of Saint Agnes outside the Walls, one of the ancient churches of Rome. The fleeces then pass to the Benedictine nuns of Santa Cecilia in the beautiful and lively Trastevere area of Rome, who weave their wool into the pallia. Both these churches preserve the remains of their saints. The finished pallia are then kept in a casket placed directly at the tomb of St Peter under the main altar at St Peter’s in the Vatican until they are presented to new archbishops. In modern times this is done at the time of the Feast of Ss Peter and Paul, June 29.

So that is why Archbishop Mark is taking off for Rome on Monday. The Pope’s nuncio will invest him with it in the near future. Getting back from Rome, the archbishop gets down to business. Things I am aware of from his no doubt filling diary include 6 July, when he is meeting us canons / consultors, 21 July when he is meeting all the clergy – and 22 July when he comes to us for our Confirmations!

Fr Matthew

Change of Gift Aid Envelope Numbering (St Brigid’s and St Paul’s)

Dear Parishioners

As things get back to normal, the parish office is updating all records of donors for Gift Aid through Standing Order and through the envelopes.

In making it easier for accounts and auditing purposes, we wish to inform you that those who are using the Gift Aid envelopes should take note that the number which was given to you before will be changed.

The change is only for us to eliminate those who have transferred to the Standing Order option and those who are no longer with us during these past years.

Your name and details are still on our records in the parish as well as the Archdiocese. You do not have to worry as we are still keeping records of all changes in our data system.

If you wish to start donating through Standing Order which is a deduction through your bank account, please download, fill in this form and submit it to your bank accordingly. 

Thank you

 

3 churches food market

Why not visit the 3 churches food market every 3rd Saturday of the month, 10.30 to 11.30am at St Brigid’s Hall?

3 Churches food market poster at St Brigid's

  • Supports needy families living in our local communities
  • Helps to combat supermarket food waste
  • All donations received used to purchase food  (each Market costs approximately £400)
  • Run by young and older volunteers from the 3 Churches
  • Christianity in action! 

Like to be involved? 

  • PRAY – for those families who come to the Food Market
  • DONATE – via the special collection at all Masses on the feast of Corpus Christi (19 June) or at any other time via the labelled envelopes always available at the back of each church (cheques made payable to St Brigid’s Parish please)
  • HELP – at the Food Markets or with food collections from local supermarkets 

If you would like to help or know more about the 3 Churches Food Markets please contact:

 

Welcoming a new archbishop

So, what is happening in the Cathedral on Monday at 12 noon? Here are some edited extracts from the Church’s code of Canon Law 382 – 387…

“A Bishop takes possession of his diocese when he shows the apostolic letters [of appointment] to the college of consultors. It is strongly recommended that this be performed with a liturgical act in the cathedral church, in the presence of the clergy and the people.”

And what is the archbishop’s job? The Code goes on: “In exercising his pastoral office, the diocesan Bishop is to be solicitous for all Christ’s faithful entrusted to his care, whatever their age, condition or nationality… He is to show an apostolic spirit also to those who, because of their condition of life, are not sufficiently able to benefit from ordinary pastoral care, and to those who have lapsed from religious practice. He is to act with humanity and charity to those who are not in full communion with the catholic Church, and foster ecumenism as it is understood by the Church. He is to consider the non-baptized as commended to him in the Lord, so that the charity of Christ, of which the Bishop must be a witness to all, may shine also on them.

He is to have a special concern for the priests, to whom he is to listen as his helpers and counsellors. He is to defend their rights and ensure that they fulfil the obligations proper to their state. He is to see that they have the means and the institutions needed for the development of their spiritual and intellectual life. He is to ensure that they are provided with adequate means of livelihood and social welfare, in accordance with the law. He must in a very special way foster vocations to the various ministries and to consecrated life, having a special care for priestly and missionary vocations.

The diocesan Bishop is bound to teach and illustrate to the faithful the truths of faith which are to be believed and applied to behaviour. However, he is to acknowledge a just freedom in the further investigation of truths. Mindful that he is bound to give an example of holiness, charity, humility and simplicity of life, the diocesan Bishop is to seek in every way to promote the holiness of Christ’s faithful according to the special vocation of each…”

Fr Matthew